‘I’m Not Talking About That’: Nancy Pelosi Snaps At Question About Leadership

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House Speaker Nancy Pelosi got testy in an exchange with a CBS News anchor over the weekend after being asked a question she did not want to answer.

During an interview with Margaret Brennan, host of the CBS Sunday program “Face the Nation,” the 82-year-old Pelosi was asked if she planned on remaining in a leadership role during the next Congress, but she appeared to take offense to the question.

“I’m not talking about that,” she snapped. “I’m here to talk about how we win the election.”

After Brennan pressed further, Pelosi doubled down. “I’m not here to talk about me. I’m here to talk about the future of America’s working families, for the children. It’s always about the children.”

“Now, we’re down to the stretch,” she told Brennan. “And we’re down to very close elections. We feel very confident. I see very clearly that the ownership of the ground is with us. It’s about getting out the vote.”

Pelosi then claimed — falsely — that Republicans have no plans for how to reduce the cost of living and prescription drugs, but that Democrats have a plan to do so and have passed legislation, such as the Inflation Reduction Act, to do so, even as inflation has continued to rise for most of Joe Biden’s presidency.

“The fight is not about inflation; it’s about the cost of living,” the House Speaker explained. “And if you look at what we have done to bring down the cost of prescription drugs, to bring down the cost of energy and the rest in our legislation, you will see that it has been opposed every step of the way by the Republicans.”

Under a Democratic Congress and White House, Republicans note, inflation has risen so much that it costs the average American household a month’s worth of wages.

Last week, one Democrat called for new leadership, leading Pelosi to say, “in some cases, there’s no substitute for experience.”

Rep. Elissa Slotkin (D-Mich.) told “Meet the Press,” “I have been very vocal, including with my own leadership in the House, that we need a new generation. We need new blood, period, across the Democratic Party, in the House, the Senate, and the White House.

“I’ve said I think we need new leaders. I would love to see some Midwestern leaders in there. Right? That’s been important to me, is to reflect on the middle of the country. We’re here too. And but I do think new blood is a good thing,” she said.

Pelosi dismissed those words as a rhetoric used to help win an election.

“I say, just win, baby. Just win. If that’s what you have to say to win, fine. We will not in any way do anything but totally support, mobilization, message, money for those people to win their races,” the Speaker said.

“We need generational change, of course, we do, but, in some cases, there’s no substitute for experience,” she said. “I think that what we had been through with the legislation under the leadership of President Biden, who has done a spectacular job — he has had a better two years than most presidents you can name, certainly in the recent generations.”

Still, rumors continue to swirl that Pelosi is “expected” to retire or “step back” after November’s midterm elections, which Republicans are heavily favored to win.

A new report reveals that California Democrat Rep. Adam Schiff is positioning himself as heir to Pelosi’s speakership if she chooses to retire after Republicans likely win back the House. Pelosi, for her part, has announced that she will seek re-election in November.

The Washington Post reports that Schiff’s efforts have “focused on consolidating support among his home base” in California, but that he “has not made an explicit ask for endorsements.”

Instead, the Post says Schiff “is gauging members’ interest and planting the seed that leading the caucus is his goal.”

The outlet adds that Schiff has reached out to progressive and minority-led congressional groups but that the response to some of that outreach has been “tepid.”

 

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