Dilbert creator says 77 newspapers canceled comic strip as it tackles woke culture

Washington Examiner

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The creator of Dilbert, Scott Adams, announced Tuesday that his comic has been canceled by nearly 77 newspapers, which he says are owned by one media company.

Dilbert follows the titular character as he navigates American office culture. Recently, as “woke” culture has permeated workplaces, it has been addressed in Adams’s comics.

“All of the wokeness and anything that permeated from ESG [environmental, social, and governance] … so that stuff made its way into the business world, and then, it became proper content for Dilbert,” he told Fox News.

Coincidentally, Adams announced on Twitter that his comic is being stripped from 77 newspapers, which is coming as a “substantial” financial blow to the creator.

“It was part of a larger overhaul, I believe, of comics, but why they decided what was in and what was out, that’s not known to anybody except them, I guess,” he said of the cancellation.

Adams began creating the comics in 1989, and they now appear in “over 2,000 newspapers, in 57 countries, and in 19 languages.”

Scott Adams
Scott Adams, creator of the comic strip Dilbert, talks about his work in his studio in in Dublin, Calif., Thursday, Oct. 26, 2006. Adams, 49, appears to be a rare example of someone who has largely but not totally, recovered from Spasmodic Dysphonia, a mysterious disease in which parts of the brain controlling speech shut down or go haywire. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)
MARCIO JOSE SANCHEZ/ASSOCIATED PRESS

A new character introduced by Adams is Dave, named after his brother. Dave is a prankster who likes to mess with his boss. For example, Dave is black, but he identifies as white.

Some recent comics follow the boss as he attempts to raise the company’s ESG rating. “Dave, I need to boost our company’s ESG rating, so I’m promoting you to be our CTO. I know you identify as white, so that won’t help our ESG scores, but would it be too much trouble to identify as gay?” the boss asks in one comic.

“Depends how hard you want me to sell it,” responds Dave.

“Just wear better shirts,” his boss says.

In another comic, the company’s boss worries that its ESG score will drop if it adds more carbon dioxide to the atmosphere; however, he finds a workaround. “But we can balance that out by adding more diversity to our board,” he explains.

“How much CO2 do you plan to add?” he’s asked.

“One nonbinary board member’s worth,” the boss responds.

“What I do is I talk about how the employees handle the situation. It’s not about the goal of it. But that’s enough to make people think that I must be taking sides politically,” Adams further explained.